Quotes

Liberty next to…

Liberty next to religion has been the motive of good deeds and the common pretext of crime.

Lord Acton
The History of Freedom (1877)

 

This is one of the truest facts of life that I have come across. There are so many examples of this: in the Russian Civil War, after the November “Revolution” (more like coup d’etat), both the White Army (more right wing members- though there were some left wing members opposed to Bolshevism) and the Red Army (mainly Bolsehviks- the “defenders” of the revolution) were fighting in the name of liberating the people from the oppressive, despotic Bolshevik or Tsarist regime respectively. And in the name of liberty the crimes committed were atrocious, and it is for fear of disgusting myself that I do not delve further. Is it not ironic how both regimes were so similar? Yet they saw themselves as enemies- this unfortunately is often the case with politics. Party interests before the nation’s. Even today crimes are being committed in the face of liberty- Russia has annexed Crimea because it is “what the people wanted”. It is just sad that people exploit this promise of liberty for their own self interest- in the case of both Hitler and the Bolsheviks who exploited a social crisis with the Great Depression of 1929 and a number of social problems exacerbated by war in Russia.

Coalesce…

Coalesce

Meh it’s an alright word. Nothing special. Simply to grow together or fuse, to amalgamate and unite. Although if we get down to some physics, linguistics and genetics….(I left out chemistry and computer science because they don’t follow the rhyme, not acceptable.)…then this word means a WHOLE lot more.

In Physics, it simply is the process where two or more particles merge after contact and form one single “daughter” particle. So this is most commonly used in meteorology. Let’s take a nice fluffy cloud, which contains thousands of tiny rain droplets. I am guessing that the more rain droplets there are, the more they collide or coalesce to form a larger droplet. When these larger droplets bash in to each other, they form even larger droplets. Eventually the size of the droplets become too heavy for the air currents to sustain and the droplets fall as rain.

In Chemistry, it is the process by which two or more (miscible) substances pull each other together after contact, so basically the same thing as physics- although it probably has different meanings in different fields of chemistry.

In linguistics, fusion or coalescence is when two segments of a word are turned in to one segment. So the most common example of this is in French, where the masculine word for a/one, “un” is pronounced without the “n”. So the u and n segments have merged together to form one sound. If you compare “un” in French to its counterpart in Spanish, “un (poco)” or “uno”, it shows that this new sound, quite nasal, has only developed in French! 

I hope that was un poco interesante!

“The world coul…

“The world could get along very well without literature; it could along even better without man”

Jean Paul Sartre– the famed French philosopher (especially in existentialism)

“Qu’est-ce que la littérature?”

Situations- 1947-49